Posts Tagged ‘Sean Wells’

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60th Annual Spanish Market July 30-31

July 27, 2011

Come join nearly 200 Spanish Colonial artisans on the historic Santa Fe Plaza July 30-31 for Spanish Market!  Jason and I will be in booth 164 near the southwest corner of the Plaza, across from the 5 & Dime.  To get the word out, we have created a somewhat elaborate mini-marketing campaign.

New Mexican Ad 2011We will have an ad in the Santa Fe New Mexican official Market newspaper insert.  I designed the ad myself.  It’s kind of wacky, but I really wanted to do something fun and festive and get away from the gallery feel.  The design is inspired by the old Sideshow posters.  The ad in the paper is black and white due to budget restrictions.

We’ve also created a video invitation that will serve as a landing page for anyone who visits our new website, www.DosArtisanos.com.  Technically, “artisanos” should read “artesanos.”  But, the ‘artesanos’ URL was not available and the misspelled ‘artisano’ is widely accepted around here and we really liked the wunderkin siblings idea–it suits our “let’s have some fun” attitude.

The promotional video was shot by our Dad and the landing page includes a link to the outtakes which is highly entertaining.

Dos Artisanos Video Landing Pageclick on image above to view our video invitation or see outtake reel.

Dos Artisanos websiteclick on image above to visit our new website.

The new website is just really a front door to our individual sites that promotes us as siblings and 5th generation artisans.  The left column is all Sean links and the right is Jason links.  You will find links to our online storefronts, a page on our videos and DVDs and links to our personal art blogs.  If you click on the stamp, you can send us an email  Or click on the Tintero images to get more information on Jason’s workshop and gallery.  I’ve also just added links to our professional Facebook pages where you can get snapshots of works in progress and event reminders.  Enjoy poking around!

click on image above to download the official Spanish Market brochure

The brochure includes artist name sand booth numbers along with some other goodies.  I hesitate to say “I designed it” since I completed it so quickly.  But, I’m proud to say I conceptualized and assembled it.

One of our family members, the talented oil painter Damian Gonzales will be showing at the Contemporary Market which happens simultaneously with Traditional Market and runs up Lincoln Street.

Click here for more logistical information on Spanish Market from the new Spanish Colonial Arts Society website (which I also designed).

Well, we hope to see you there!  And, remember to support your local artisans!

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Our Lady of Guadalupe Collaboration

April 13, 2011
Jason and Sean at work

Click on image to watch this episode online!

We just completed shooting the final episode of our premiere Season of our respective shows, New Mexican Santera and New Mexican Tinsmith.  Dad had the excellent idea to do a collaborative piece for the final episode.  I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to share with viewers the dynamic of two artists collaborating.  It was very spontaneous since Jason didn’t even know the size of my board before showing up to shoot the show.  He did a fantastic job quickly responding with a design concept and improvising some design ideas.

Our Lady of Guadalupe in Tin

copyright ©2011 Sean Wells y Delgado & Jason Younis y Delgado

We both have a few finishing touches to add, but you can get a sense of the direction of the finished piece.  Jason came up with a Corona gesture for the top piece that poetically reflects the crown of Mary.  He also added delicate stars around the frame and roses to recall the story of Juan Diego.  I asked him to include thorns on his vine to hint at the crown of thorns that Jesus wore.

We decided to take advantage of the project to use it as our submission for the National Hispanic Cultural Center’s annual Art Auction ABQ Nouveau Retablo 2011.  You can view and bid on this piece and many other traditional and contemporary retablo creations Friday May 6 from 6PM-8:30PM at the National Hispanic Cultural Center Pete V. Domenici Education Building.  Check out www.ABQretablos.com for more information and to view this piece online next week.

What a fun project!  We hope to do more on-air collaborations next season.  But, until then, the local stations will be rerunning our first season Wednesday nights at 9PM Comcast Encantada | Ch26 Albuquerque  | Ch16 Santa Fe.

Now that we have our first season complete, we plan to offer our shows to the other public access channels of the Southwest.  We will update our list when we get some confirmations!

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE
[Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe]
1531 A.D. | Feast Day Dec 12  | Marian Image

A humble local named Juan Diego claimed to have been visited by the Virgin Mary.  The local Bishop requested a sign.  Juan Diego returned (on what is now her Feast Day) with a gift of blooming roses that had appeared in mid winter on the hill where the apparition spoke to him.  He carried the flowers in his cloak and as he spilled them out for the Bishop, the image of the Virgin appeared on his cloak just as Juan Diego had described her.  The Bishop fell to his knees and built a chapel on the hill.  The cloak still hangs today in a shrine on the original hill.  The image has come to represent the worldly love and peace that Mary has to offer, crossing ethnic boundaries.

detail of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Tin

NOTE:  Videotero, LLC, Delgado Arts, New Mexican Santera and New Mexican Tinsmith have no affiliation with The National Hispanic Cultural Center or ABQ Nouveau Retablo.  We are simply using this opportunity to promote an organization that shares the similar goal of preserving the Spanish Colonial Arts.

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San Miguel | Saint Michael

March 30, 2011
Saint Michael Retablo by Sean Wells

Saint Michael Retablo copyright ©2011 Sean Wells y Delgado

As prince of the seraphim the archangel Michael led the charge against the uprising stemming from Lucifer’s betrayal.  Lucifer, at that time was one of the most favored angels.  But, after Michael defeated him, Lucifer is cast down.  Although called upon to defend the Church throughout history, it is not for his military strength that he is revered most, but for his healing powers offering miracle healing at several fonts and on various occasion.  His name translates to “Who is like God?” signifying his humility.  Scales represent his weighing of the souls of Man upon Judgement Day.  His angelic wings imply swiftness and his sword represent his strength.

San Miguel  |  Saint Michael

feast day September 29

Patron Saint of artists, bakers, grocers, mariners, paratroopers, police, EMT’s, haberdashers, bankers

Invoked against illness

symbols:  Conquered Demon/Devil, Sword, Scale/Balance,wings

THIS RETABLO AVAILABLE ONLINE

Detail of Saint Michael retablo

copyright ©2011 Sean Wells y Delgado

NEW MEXICAN SANTERA TO AIR TONIGHT:  To learn more about Saint Michael and his connection to my family, be sure to tune in to Comcast Encatada TV tonight 9PM (Wednesday) to see the second episode on the Saint Michael retablo.  Channel 26 Albuquerque, Channel 16 Santa Fe.

It was a challenging retablo for me on many levels.  But, I have taken a big step forward in my development of the Saint Michael imagery.  I look forward to the opportunity to paint him in the future.  Pattern for this retablo is available on the link to the right labeled “09 Patterns” under “PAGES.”

Saint Michael Painting by Sean Wells

earlier Saint Michael painting copyright ©2011 Sean Wells

I also mention in the episode how I have attempted to paint him several times before I really committed to the study of the craft of retablo.  I like the resulting paintings, but never felt like they were retablos in the true sense of the word.  I found an image of one of the paintings that I promised I would share.  You can see, it is much more animated and realistic with muscles, shadows and has a cartoon graphic influence.  I like this image very much, but I think of it as a painting of Saint Michael rather than a retablo.

SAINT DATABASE LIVE:  I finally got the Saint Database so it is fully searchable!  Now, you can search for your favorite Saint my several criteria including symbols and colors!  I’ve always wanted to produce this database.  I am just starting it, so there are only a dozen Saints so far, but I will be adding to it continuously.  If you’d like to contribute to the development of this database, consider a donation. ¡Hasta Luego!

Saint Michael Retablo by Sean Younis Youth MarketUPDATE:  I located a couple of pictures from Children’s Market more than 2 decades ago!  Thought you would enjoy seeing me and it had a shot of the Saint Michael with my proud little 2nd place ribbon hanging on it!  I was still “Sean Younis” then.  It was actually purchased by one of the jurors.  So, if anyone happens to know who the owner is, I’d love to let them know what I’m up to these days!
Me beaming at children's market so many years ago! 

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Good News!

February 15, 2011

After having a bit of a cranky day, I came home to the best Valentine’s Day Card ever…a note from the Spanish Colonial Arts Society welcoming me as a NEW ARTIST FOR SPANISH MARKET 2011!  My husband actually debated whether to present it to me on V-Day or not.  He watched me check the mailbox every day since the jury.  And, he admitted to preparing a pep-speech should it be a disappointing note.  That was the best gift from him, knowing he is with me on this ride.  The letter came on a beautiful letterhead with a nice watermark of the SCAS logo.  It said the committee wanted to pass on some feedback on my work.  I’m not sure it’s something I should share, but it was generally positive with some constructive criticism that I will contemplate.  My husband and I had fun discussing our interpretations of the meaning of their comments.  I am just so pleased and I look forward to making plans with my brother  (he’s already juried in from a previous year in the tinwork category).  I am both relieved and exhilarated!

Our Lady of Guadalupe 001To keep my mind busy during the week, I worked on an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  It is not for Market, since it is on a reclaimed board.  It was a tacky board I picked up at a yard sale for a quarter that had an attempt at Tole painting on the front.  It looked like someone had abandoned the painting before completion.  So, I adopted the board and sanded off the old image.  I knew I wanted to paint the Lady of Guadalupe image on it, but it wasn’t until I decided to put the cherub below the votive shelf that the work really got interesting.  I used the imagery of the crescent moon  and the falling of the fabric of her gown to tie the top to the bottom.  I adore the face of the angel.  In the original Guadalupe, the angel is noted for a cherubic presence, but an adult face.

Our Lady of Guadalupe cherub detail

Since I knew it was not for Market, I also used a watercolor ultramarine blue to imitate the natural Lapis color of her gown.  I haven’t really been using blue to date, but wanted a brighter palette for this Guadalupana image.  I’m working on a formula to extract the color from lapis lazuli stones, but the color is still not satisfactory and the process is both expensive and labor intensive.

Our Lady of Guadalupe sgrafitto detailI’ve attached some close-ups of the sgrafitto work on the dress pattern that I’m especially fond of.  I asked my brother to add one of his sweet little leaf votives and it was the perfect compliment for her.  We decided to attach it at a 45 degree rotation so the leaves would frame her dress instead of competing with it.  It was fun to collaborate together, even on such a small element.  Most of the time, we’re just handing pieces off to one another.

The Guadalupana story is compelling and beautiful.  The symbolism of this iconic image is rich.  I made a conscious effort to avoid painting her while I got comfortable with my painting style.  I doubt there is a more recognized retablo image and I was afraid it would be too easy to slip into the kitschy niche she seems to attract.  But, I will save my full write up on her when I release the Guadalupana episode of New Mexican Santera (assuming we secure some underwriting for season two).

Jason installing tin votive This retablo is currently available at Tintero Gallery or in my online store.  She’s quite tall, measuring somewhere  around 15″ tall and maybe 8″-10″ wide.  Well, I suppose I should try to get some sleep.  Lots to dream about!

Oh, New Mexican Santera will be airing Wed Feb 15 at 9PM.
Albuquerque Comcast Ch 26 The final episode of Saint Rita
Santa Fe Comcast Ch 6 The first episode of Saint Rita

Followed by New Mexican Tinsmith!

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La Conquistadora in Colcha

December 1, 2010
La Conquistadora 02

copyright © 2010 Sean Wells y Delgado

I just completed the second La Conquistadora retablo. She is shown in a colcha gown by Artist Julia Gomez, featured in the exhibit Threads of Devotion.  The cape is very moving in real life.  It is hand-embroidered using the traditional colcha stitch.  The base is a course, hand-woven wool cloth called “sabanilla,” with a texture like muslin.  I really wanted to capture the textures of the cloth so I used  sgraffito (technique scratching the top surface color to reveal the undercoat color) over the entire cloth area.  It came out very pleasing.  I will have to take a close-up.  The retablo measures 12″x18″ and is done in a mix of natural pigments, clays and watercolor.  I used a real blue to honor the colors of the original gown since Julia uses traditional dyes.  I may be using this as one of my Spanish Market entry submittals.  But, after the jury, it will be available for purchase at Jason’s Tintero Gallery.

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Saint Peter | San Pedro

November 10, 2010
retablo of Saint Peter

© copyright 2010 Sean Wells y Delgado

As a Mom of two, it is difficult for me to set aside the time to focus on art.  I’ve actually been working on the previous sentence for the last 2 hours. So, to help me seperate my work time from my Mom time, I have decided to assign themes to my days.  Today was my first dedicated Retablo day.  It was very relaxing to feel I could unfurl my painting supplies and projects on the kitchen table without trying to accomplish 20 other things or worry about interruptions and tiny hands.  I intended to work on ornaments in preparation for the holidays, but there was a board that has been calling to me for years.  I stared at it until I remembered an image my Grandmother had always wanted me to paint. It was a Saint Peter.  She wanted me to paint him as if you were looking through a keyhole.

As I stared at the board imagining an image that would compliment the board shape, the image of the keyhole became clear and I knew it would be the perfect saint for this board.  I found the board at a yard sale in Alexandria, Virginia.  I was told it was an antique and used to stretch pelts of animals like muskrats.  It looks well-aged and has a wonderful deep and weathered grain.  It looks like it may have once been the top of a fence.  I really love the idea of using a reclaimed board since I think often, the santero used whatever substrates were available.  Nothing went to waste.  So, although the board is not hand shaped by me or even made from a local wood, using reclaimed resources is in the spirit of our pioneering predecessor artisans.

Detail of Saint Peter retablo

© copyright 2010 Sean Wells y Delgado

I read up on Saint Peter to refresh my memory and studied several images of him.  He is shown with an oversized key and is seen as the gatekeeper to Heaven. He is often shown holding a book, a symbol of wisdom.  As a fisherman himself, he is patron saint to boaters.  He wears a red robe.

I was most taken with the story that he denies being apostle to Christ to save himself as Jesus is put on trial.  He is ashamed of his action and confesses to Jesus and is forgiven.  Once called “Simon,” Jesus anoints him with the name “Peter” which, in Greek,  translates to “rock.”  Matthew 16:18 says,”You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church.”  Peter is not judged on his failure, but on his potential for success. He is given the key to the gates of Heaven in the greatest demonstration of faith.  He goes on to live up to that expectation as a loyal disciple and is generally accepted as the first Pope.

Once I had all the imagery in my head, I sketched out the image and the painting flowed quickly.  It is a larger piece measuring about 14″ tall.  It will be a challenge to hang since the board is not weighted symmetrically.  But,  I was pleased with being able to finish an entire larger piece in one sitting.  I really love the keyhole as well as his expression.

Saint Peter  |  San Pedro
feast day June 29
symbols:  book, large key, rooster, fishing net, red robe.