Posts Tagged ‘Our Lady of Guadalupe’

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Our Lady of Guadalupe Collaboration

April 13, 2011
Jason and Sean at work

Click on image to watch this episode online!

We just completed shooting the final episode of our premiere Season of our respective shows, New Mexican Santera and New Mexican Tinsmith.  Dad had the excellent idea to do a collaborative piece for the final episode.  I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to share with viewers the dynamic of two artists collaborating.  It was very spontaneous since Jason didn’t even know the size of my board before showing up to shoot the show.  He did a fantastic job quickly responding with a design concept and improvising some design ideas.

Our Lady of Guadalupe in Tin

copyright ©2011 Sean Wells y Delgado & Jason Younis y Delgado

We both have a few finishing touches to add, but you can get a sense of the direction of the finished piece.  Jason came up with a Corona gesture for the top piece that poetically reflects the crown of Mary.  He also added delicate stars around the frame and roses to recall the story of Juan Diego.  I asked him to include thorns on his vine to hint at the crown of thorns that Jesus wore.

We decided to take advantage of the project to use it as our submission for the National Hispanic Cultural Center’s annual Art Auction ABQ Nouveau Retablo 2011.  You can view and bid on this piece and many other traditional and contemporary retablo creations Friday May 6 from 6PM-8:30PM at the National Hispanic Cultural Center Pete V. Domenici Education Building.  Check out www.ABQretablos.com for more information and to view this piece online next week.

What a fun project!  We hope to do more on-air collaborations next season.  But, until then, the local stations will be rerunning our first season Wednesday nights at 9PM Comcast Encantada | Ch26 Albuquerque  | Ch16 Santa Fe.

Now that we have our first season complete, we plan to offer our shows to the other public access channels of the Southwest.  We will update our list when we get some confirmations!

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE
[Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe]
1531 A.D. | Feast Day Dec 12  | Marian Image

A humble local named Juan Diego claimed to have been visited by the Virgin Mary.  The local Bishop requested a sign.  Juan Diego returned (on what is now her Feast Day) with a gift of blooming roses that had appeared in mid winter on the hill where the apparition spoke to him.  He carried the flowers in his cloak and as he spilled them out for the Bishop, the image of the Virgin appeared on his cloak just as Juan Diego had described her.  The Bishop fell to his knees and built a chapel on the hill.  The cloak still hangs today in a shrine on the original hill.  The image has come to represent the worldly love and peace that Mary has to offer, crossing ethnic boundaries.

detail of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Tin

NOTE:  Videotero, LLC, Delgado Arts, New Mexican Santera and New Mexican Tinsmith have no affiliation with The National Hispanic Cultural Center or ABQ Nouveau Retablo.  We are simply using this opportunity to promote an organization that shares the similar goal of preserving the Spanish Colonial Arts.

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Good News!

February 15, 2011

After having a bit of a cranky day, I came home to the best Valentine’s Day Card ever…a note from the Spanish Colonial Arts Society welcoming me as a NEW ARTIST FOR SPANISH MARKET 2011!  My husband actually debated whether to present it to me on V-Day or not.  He watched me check the mailbox every day since the jury.  And, he admitted to preparing a pep-speech should it be a disappointing note.  That was the best gift from him, knowing he is with me on this ride.  The letter came on a beautiful letterhead with a nice watermark of the SCAS logo.  It said the committee wanted to pass on some feedback on my work.  I’m not sure it’s something I should share, but it was generally positive with some constructive criticism that I will contemplate.  My husband and I had fun discussing our interpretations of the meaning of their comments.  I am just so pleased and I look forward to making plans with my brother  (he’s already juried in from a previous year in the tinwork category).  I am both relieved and exhilarated!

Our Lady of Guadalupe 001To keep my mind busy during the week, I worked on an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  It is not for Market, since it is on a reclaimed board.  It was a tacky board I picked up at a yard sale for a quarter that had an attempt at Tole painting on the front.  It looked like someone had abandoned the painting before completion.  So, I adopted the board and sanded off the old image.  I knew I wanted to paint the Lady of Guadalupe image on it, but it wasn’t until I decided to put the cherub below the votive shelf that the work really got interesting.  I used the imagery of the crescent moon  and the falling of the fabric of her gown to tie the top to the bottom.  I adore the face of the angel.  In the original Guadalupe, the angel is noted for a cherubic presence, but an adult face.

Our Lady of Guadalupe cherub detail

Since I knew it was not for Market, I also used a watercolor ultramarine blue to imitate the natural Lapis color of her gown.  I haven’t really been using blue to date, but wanted a brighter palette for this Guadalupana image.  I’m working on a formula to extract the color from lapis lazuli stones, but the color is still not satisfactory and the process is both expensive and labor intensive.

Our Lady of Guadalupe sgrafitto detailI’ve attached some close-ups of the sgrafitto work on the dress pattern that I’m especially fond of.  I asked my brother to add one of his sweet little leaf votives and it was the perfect compliment for her.  We decided to attach it at a 45 degree rotation so the leaves would frame her dress instead of competing with it.  It was fun to collaborate together, even on such a small element.  Most of the time, we’re just handing pieces off to one another.

The Guadalupana story is compelling and beautiful.  The symbolism of this iconic image is rich.  I made a conscious effort to avoid painting her while I got comfortable with my painting style.  I doubt there is a more recognized retablo image and I was afraid it would be too easy to slip into the kitschy niche she seems to attract.  But, I will save my full write up on her when I release the Guadalupana episode of New Mexican Santera (assuming we secure some underwriting for season two).

Jason installing tin votive This retablo is currently available at Tintero Gallery or in my online store.  She’s quite tall, measuring somewhere  around 15″ tall and maybe 8″-10″ wide.  Well, I suppose I should try to get some sleep.  Lots to dream about!

Oh, New Mexican Santera will be airing Wed Feb 15 at 9PM.
Albuquerque Comcast Ch 26 The final episode of Saint Rita
Santa Fe Comcast Ch 6 The first episode of Saint Rita

Followed by New Mexican Tinsmith!