Posts Tagged ‘Delgado’

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60th Annual Spanish Market July 30-31

July 27, 2011

Come join nearly 200 Spanish Colonial artisans on the historic Santa Fe Plaza July 30-31 for Spanish Market!  Jason and I will be in booth 164 near the southwest corner of the Plaza, across from the 5 & Dime.  To get the word out, we have created a somewhat elaborate mini-marketing campaign.

New Mexican Ad 2011We will have an ad in the Santa Fe New Mexican official Market newspaper insert.  I designed the ad myself.  It’s kind of wacky, but I really wanted to do something fun and festive and get away from the gallery feel.  The design is inspired by the old Sideshow posters.  The ad in the paper is black and white due to budget restrictions.

We’ve also created a video invitation that will serve as a landing page for anyone who visits our new website, www.DosArtisanos.com.  Technically, “artisanos” should read “artesanos.”  But, the ‘artesanos’ URL was not available and the misspelled ‘artisano’ is widely accepted around here and we really liked the wunderkin siblings idea–it suits our “let’s have some fun” attitude.

The promotional video was shot by our Dad and the landing page includes a link to the outtakes which is highly entertaining.

Dos Artisanos Video Landing Pageclick on image above to view our video invitation or see outtake reel.

Dos Artisanos websiteclick on image above to visit our new website.

The new website is just really a front door to our individual sites that promotes us as siblings and 5th generation artisans.  The left column is all Sean links and the right is Jason links.  You will find links to our online storefronts, a page on our videos and DVDs and links to our personal art blogs.  If you click on the stamp, you can send us an email  Or click on the Tintero images to get more information on Jason’s workshop and gallery.  I’ve also just added links to our professional Facebook pages where you can get snapshots of works in progress and event reminders.  Enjoy poking around!

click on image above to download the official Spanish Market brochure

The brochure includes artist name sand booth numbers along with some other goodies.  I hesitate to say “I designed it” since I completed it so quickly.  But, I’m proud to say I conceptualized and assembled it.

One of our family members, the talented oil painter Damian Gonzales will be showing at the Contemporary Market which happens simultaneously with Traditional Market and runs up Lincoln Street.

Click here for more logistical information on Spanish Market from the new Spanish Colonial Arts Society website (which I also designed).

Well, we hope to see you there!  And, remember to support your local artisans!

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Saint Peter | San Pedro

November 10, 2010
retablo of Saint Peter

© copyright 2010 Sean Wells y Delgado

As a Mom of two, it is difficult for me to set aside the time to focus on art.  I’ve actually been working on the previous sentence for the last 2 hours. So, to help me seperate my work time from my Mom time, I have decided to assign themes to my days.  Today was my first dedicated Retablo day.  It was very relaxing to feel I could unfurl my painting supplies and projects on the kitchen table without trying to accomplish 20 other things or worry about interruptions and tiny hands.  I intended to work on ornaments in preparation for the holidays, but there was a board that has been calling to me for years.  I stared at it until I remembered an image my Grandmother had always wanted me to paint. It was a Saint Peter.  She wanted me to paint him as if you were looking through a keyhole.

As I stared at the board imagining an image that would compliment the board shape, the image of the keyhole became clear and I knew it would be the perfect saint for this board.  I found the board at a yard sale in Alexandria, Virginia.  I was told it was an antique and used to stretch pelts of animals like muskrats.  It looks well-aged and has a wonderful deep and weathered grain.  It looks like it may have once been the top of a fence.  I really love the idea of using a reclaimed board since I think often, the santero used whatever substrates were available.  Nothing went to waste.  So, although the board is not hand shaped by me or even made from a local wood, using reclaimed resources is in the spirit of our pioneering predecessor artisans.

Detail of Saint Peter retablo

© copyright 2010 Sean Wells y Delgado

I read up on Saint Peter to refresh my memory and studied several images of him.  He is shown with an oversized key and is seen as the gatekeeper to Heaven. He is often shown holding a book, a symbol of wisdom.  As a fisherman himself, he is patron saint to boaters.  He wears a red robe.

I was most taken with the story that he denies being apostle to Christ to save himself as Jesus is put on trial.  He is ashamed of his action and confesses to Jesus and is forgiven.  Once called “Simon,” Jesus anoints him with the name “Peter” which, in Greek,  translates to “rock.”  Matthew 16:18 says,”You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church.”  Peter is not judged on his failure, but on his potential for success. He is given the key to the gates of Heaven in the greatest demonstration of faith.  He goes on to live up to that expectation as a loyal disciple and is generally accepted as the first Pope.

Once I had all the imagery in my head, I sketched out the image and the painting flowed quickly.  It is a larger piece measuring about 14″ tall.  It will be a challenge to hang since the board is not weighted symmetrically.  But,  I was pleased with being able to finish an entire larger piece in one sitting.  I really love the keyhole as well as his expression.

Saint Peter  |  San Pedro
feast day June 29
symbols:  book, large key, rooster, fishing net, red robe.

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Articles on Ildeberto and Francisco Delgado

October 31, 2010
iIldeberto Delgado nicho

A nicho by iIldeberto Delgado

Jason found some great write-ups on great-great grandfather Francisco and great grandfather Ildeberto Delgado.  It’s part of the International Folk Art Museum in Santa Fe.  They wrote a book and had an exhibit called “Sin Nombre” (“Without A Name”) on artists that were supported through the Great Depression by the New Deal Works Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project (FAP).  I remember studying it in school, but it has a whole new meaning to me now that I know two key figures in our family line were supported and honored with projects from this program.  It even has more meaning as our budding family struggles in a difficult economy and I turn to retablos myself in an effort to both survive and define myself with some self-resepct.  Maybe Obama will commission some retablos from me for the White House!  They have a great record of some of the major commissions around town, some of them still in place.  I’d love to visit all of them in situ.

Francisco Delgado chandelier

Chandelier by Francisco Delgado

Jason was recently asked to restore some tin items at the Albuquerque Little Theater recently.  When he arrived to remove the pieces, he asked if they knew anything about the artist.  They didn’t have any records, but Jason immediately recognized them as coming from our family.  He talked to our Grandmother (who we refer to as “Nanny”) and she confirmed they had been produced by Ildeberto in the 1930’s.  It was a real honor for Jason to restore the pieces and it was equally exciting for the Little Theater to learn of the connection!

Here is the original article that appears on the International Folk Art website:

Sin Nombre

Look for “Francisco Delgado” and “Ildeberto Delgado along the left hand side.

Ildeberto Delgado Lunette

This piece was part of an electrified nicho; one of a pair made by Delgado for the Albuquerque Little Theater in 1936 as a part of a WPA/FAP commission. I believe this was one of the pieces Jason restored.